Upcoming Events

Virtual Engagements on Global China

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Online Event

This public lecture series features international scholars and experts on a wide range of topics related to China's global presence and impacts. Each seminar will begin with a 30-min presentation, followed by another 30 mins of Q&A. The series is free and open to the global public. Participants must register before each seminar.  READ MORE...

"Global Hong Kong: Lessons from Elsewhere" Speaker Series

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Online Event

As Hong Kong experiences unprecedented political and social upheavals, we invite speakers who can shed light on other societies which have faced similar challenges. Putting Hong Kong in global perspectives may inspire comparative research, theoretical and historical reflections, as well as public discussions on our collective future. Each public lecture will begin with a 30-min presentation, followed by another 30 mins of Q&A. The series is free and open to the public. Participants must register before each event. READ MORE...

Global China Humanities Series

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Online Event

The Center launches its inaugural Global China Humanities Lecture Series in February 2021. We invite internationally renowned scholars and young, first-book authors to discuss their latest works on topics ranging from Cold War history, diaspora studies, global medicine to literature.   READ MORE...

二戰後中共勝利的蘇聯因素問題

Zoom

二戰結束、日本投降後的國際國內形勢,並不利於中共用武力推翻國民黨政權。導致蔣介石國民黨失敗的原因很多,任何原因都不是唯一重要的,但對中共的成功而言,蘇聯因素的作用卻是不可或缺的。蘇聯因素的作用是多方面的,蘇軍佔領東北期間武器彈藥方面的協助對中共武裝在東北發展壯大至關重要,然而中共武裝能夠進入東北、在東北廣大區域利用中東鐵路等交通設施,包括能夠在和國民黨作戰期間出入朝鮮、外蒙,利用蘇軍控制的旅大地區等等,顯然是意識形態的因素,以及斯大林基於冷戰思維調整其對美對華政策所帶來的結果。換言之,毛澤東1949年7月公開發表《論人民民主專政》一文,宣布向蘇聯“一邊倒”;1950年2月締結中蘇友好互助同盟條約,毛澤東宣稱這是為中國找到一個“好幫手”,其實都可以看出中共對其戰後成功有著怎樣的經驗總結。 READ MORE...

China’s engagement with Brazil since 2000: Key actors, strategies and conflicts

Zoom

Brazil is China’s largest trade partner in Latin America, exporting petroleum, iron ore, soybeans and other agricultural commodities in exchange for manufactured products from China. This mushrooming bilateral trade triggered massive Chinese investments in Brazil, yet diplomatic ties have frayed and Brazil hasn’t joined China’s Belt and Road Initiative. This talk outlines the key actors and interests shaping this relation, arguing their strategies align in advancing an eco-modernist partnership that transcends current diplomatic controversies. The real problems at stake, therefore, emerge from political ecological conflicts within China and Brazil themselves that become aggravated when state and corporate interests from both countries align in a strategic partnership. READ MORE...

Taiwan Civil Society in Authoritarian Era 威權主義與台灣公民社會

Microsoft Team

Prof. Wu Jieh Min 吳介民教授 (Academia Sinica) & Prof. Chen Tsui Lien 陳翠蓮教授 (NTU) Commentator: Prof. Kin Man Chan 陳健民教授 日期:12th March 2021 (Fri), 17:00 (HK/ Taiwan) READ MORE...

China and Africa's industrialization aspirations: a labour perspective

Zoom

There are emerging claims that African countries will follow Asia in their industrialization drive and that Asian firms, notably from China, may act as catalysts of industrial transformations by investing and operating in Africa. This session will look at this new dynamics with a focus on employment outcomes, i.e. job creation for young Africans, working conditions and skill development from a comparative perspective. The main argument is that the creation of new jobs in manufacturing and infrastructure construction contributes to the process of structural transformation through the labour market but not without frictions and challenges. The building of an industrial workforce has never been harmonious. READ MORE...

Smuggling and State Power in Modern China

Zoom

Smuggling along the Chinese coast has long been a thorn in the side of many regimes. From opium concealed aboard steamships in the Qing dynasty to wristwatches trafficked in the People’s Republic, contests between state and smuggler have exerted a surprising but crucial influence on the political economy of modern China. Seeking to enforce trade regulations and protect critical revenues, successive governments from the late Qing through the early People’s Republic have violently cracked down on smuggling. Tighter regulations, higher taxes, and harsher enforcement all helped to consolidate domestic authority and confront foreign challenges. But these bold interventions did much more. They also sparked widespread defiance, triggering further coercive measures. Smuggling thus animated a paradoxical dynamic in China’s history: it simultaneously threatened state power while inviting repression that strengthened state authority. This lecture chronicles the history of smuggling in modern China by looking at its practice, suppression, and significance. It argues that the fight against smuggling was not simply a law enforcement problem but an impetus to expanding state capacity, broadcasting state authority, and transforming everyday life. Indeed, while smuggling might have operated on the margins of the law, it was far from marginal in remaking China. READ MORE...

China and the environment: Ecological Civilisation and its discontents

Zoom

The Chinese government has stated its intention to take the lead on climate change, and “Ecological Civilisation” has become an important slogan for Chinese President Xi Jinping. China has demonstrated a remarkable energy transformation in its domestic market. But Chinese firms, private and state-owned alike, are finding an outlet for overcapacity and shrinking domestic markets by exporting carbon-intensive production overseas. This presents a challenge to the vision of a cleaner power sector in many countries, particularly those at an important inflection point in their development. This talk will examine the impact, drivers and likely trajectory of China’s development and overseas investments, from rhetoric to reality. READ MORE...

Past Events

Rosy Fantasies: Edgar Snow, John Service, Joseph Stilwell, and their China

Zoom

Edgar Snow, John S. Service, and Joseph W. Stilwell had overlapping and intertwined China experiences. They played unexpectedly pivotal roles in the rise of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Edgar Snow (1905-72) was a foreign correspondent in China from 1928 to 1941 and returned to the country in 1960, 1964-65, and 1970. He promulgated what was to later become prevailing imagery of the Chinese Communists as agrarian reformers. Born to an American missionary family in Chengdu, John S. Service (1909-99) served as a diplomat to China from 1933 to 1945 and revisited the country in 1971. Taking part in the Dixie Mission to Yan’an, Service emerged as Washington’s major source of information on the CCP. Old China Hand General Joseph W. Stilwell (1883-1946) was stationed in China in 1920-23, 1935-39 and 1942-44. He played a crucial role in changing American perceptions of the Chinese Communists and Chinese Nationalists. Snow, Service, and Stilwell all claimed to sincerely love the Chinese people. But what did they really think of China? This study will zoom in on their perceptions of China as expressed in their own words and deeds and explore how their perceptions impacted the course of history. READ MORE...

Global Medicine in Chinese East Asia, 1937-1970

Zoom

By examining two case studies on how the Chinese diaspora came to shape biomedicine in China and Taiwan from 1937 to 1970, my new book makes the case of the concept of "global medicine." "Global medicine" highlights the multivalent and multidirectional flows of medical practices and ideas circulating the world that shaped Chinese East Asia in the 20th century. The first case study examines how Chinese American women medical personnel established the first Chinese blood in New York and Kunming, China. Second, this talk reveals how Singapore-born and Edinburgh-educated Dr. Robert Lim successfully relocated the National Defense Medical Center from China to Taiwan in 1948 despite the Chinese Civil War's longstanding challenges. This presentation highlights the critical intersections of scientific expertise, political freedoms, and diasporic power in shaping global medicine in China and Taiwan through a critical examination of these two medical encounters between the diaspora and the local Chinese and Taiwanese. READ MORE...

China's Global Migration in the New Millennium

Zoom

China is the world’s largest source country of migrant students (making up 14% of the global total in 2018) and investors (PRC investors made up 75% of the recipients of US EB-5 visas in 2017). Why are those who have benefited the most from China’s development eager to leave China, the rising centre of the world economy? This lecture suggests that China’s global migration in the new millennium reflects the internationalization of life reproduction among those who have means. Chinese migrate overseas in order to benefit from better education, care, air, food and water, and personal and wealth security. They do so with considerable financial cost. All these benefits are meant to maintain and enhance life, instead of making money, thus “reproduction”. This lecture positions China’s on-going outflows in a historical context, and explores the relations between migration, capital accumulation, and shifts in the global political economy. READ MORE...

毛澤東宣佈「一邊倒」:建國前後中共與美、蘇關係的變化

Zoom

毛澤東宣佈「一邊倒」:建國前後中共與美、蘇關係的變化 READ MORE...

Global China Humanities Series: Maoism: A Global History

Zoom

Since 2012 – and for the first time since the death of Mao in 1976 – China has experienced an official revival of Maoist culture and politics. Despite the huge human cost of Mao’s rule, on 1 October 2019 (the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China) the Chinese Communist Party staged a festival of patriotism invoking Mao as august builder of the party and nation. But this definition of Mao as respectable paterfamilias obscures other, more destabilising legacies of Maoism – a volatile mix of militarised autocracy, anti-colonial rebellion and ‘continuous revolution’.... READ MORE...

Book event: The Resistant Community (反抗的共同體)

Microsoft Team

About the "Global Hong Kong: Lessons from Elsewhere" Speaker Series

As Hong Kong experiences unprecedented political and social upheavals, we invite speakers who can shed light on other societies which have faced similar challenges. Putting Hong Kong in global perspectives may inspire comparative research, theoretical and historical reflections, as well as public discussions on our collective future.

 

READ MORE...

Global Hong Kong Speaker Series: Authoritarian Resilience or Democratic Pluralism? Singapore’s Fork in the Road

Zoom

About the "Global Hong Kong: Lessons from Elsewhere" Speaker Series

As Hong Kong experiences unprecedented political and social upheavals, we invite speakers who can shed light on other societies which have faced similar challenges. Putting Hong Kong in global perspectives may inspire comparative research, theoretical and historical reflections, as well as public discussions on our collective future.

 

READ MORE...

Global Hong Kong Speaker Series: Undongkwŏn as a Counterpublic Sphere in the South Korean Minjung Movement

Zoom

Looking at the South Korean student movement within the larger context of the minjung movement, this talk will focus on discursive strategies that constituted undongkwŏn (“the movement sphere”) as a counterpublic, the process through which an ordinary student entered the realm of undongkwŏn, the ways in which the undongkwŏn culture was created and maintained, and how the counterpublic sphere is related to the process of larger societal transformation. READ MORE...

[RESCHEDULE] China and the environment: Ecological Civilisation and its discontents

Zoom

The Chinese government has stated its intention to take the lead on climate change, and “Ecological Civilisation” has become an important slogan for Chinese President Xi Jinping. China has demonstrated a remarkable energy transformation in its domestic market. But Chinese firms, private and state-owned alike, are finding an outlet for overcapacity and shrinking domestic markets by exporting carbon-intensive production overseas. This presents a challenge to the vision of a cleaner power sector in many countries, particularly those at an important inflection point in their development. This talk will examine the impact, drivers and likely trajectory of China’s development and overseas investments, from rhetoric to reality. READ MORE...

Global Hong Kong Speaker Series: Strategies in the struggle against Apartheid Authoritarianism in South Africa

Zoom

At the beginning of the 1980s, the prospects for a democratic transition in South Africa seemed remote. Nelson Mandela was in prison and the Apartheid state was a sophisticated authoritarian regime, combining limited reforms with an increasingly militarised security state. However, over the course of the decade, a powerful mass movement emerged which combined in 1983 to form the United Democratic Front. This movement engaged in a sustained strategy to render the apartheid state illegitimate, and ultimately led to the negotiations which resulted in the transition to a single, non-racial, secular and democratic state. In this paper, Professor Cherry, who was herself an activist in this movement throughout the decade of the 1980s, explores the strategy and tactics of the movement, including the ways in which the movement coped with the repressive measures of the authoritarian Apartheid regime. READ MORE...

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